Public Policy & Public Administration

Name: Kattalina Berriochoa
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: kberriochoa@gmail.com
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: University of Massachusetts, Boston
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
Participation Type:
Roundtable Title:
Roundtable Description:
Paper Title: Analyzing Tax Preferences for Education
Panel Title:
Panel Description:
Roundtable Description:
Co-author info:
Co-presenter info:
Abstract:
For governments, education is one of the costliest goods provided to citizens. Its hefty cost is justified by the fundamental positive role of education for society and economies and this is why education is treated as a publicly-provided good, rather than through private markets. Further, there is an inherent investment nature to education: society pays upfront costs for young people to become educated, and eventually, find gainful employment and become productive members of society. At the core of this relationship is redistribution, where --through policy mechanisms, there is a transfer of income from older to younger generations, all with the underlying agreement that this initial payout will secure a return of investment. This paper analyzes the micro-level, individual determinants for policy preferences for funding towards public education. Using the 2014 Cooperative Congressional Election Study (CCES) survey data, this project analyzes individual preferences for redistribution by measuring attitudes about current tax levels that fund public schools. Utilizing the multinomial logit (MNL) model, we model preferences among taxation options as a function of social, economic, and demographic characteristics. We find that the main determinant for taxation levels for education is an individual’s own educational experience, however, ideology also plays a significant role. Within the political economy and public policy literature, this study furthers our understanding about preferences for redistribution and tax policies for publicly provided goods such as education.


Name: Don Brand
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: dbrand8@townisp.com
Professional Status: Full Professor
Institution: College of the Holy Cross
Scheduling Preference: Friday Morning
Proposal Type: Roundtable
Participation Type: Moderator
Roundtable Title: Is Administrative Law Unlawful?
Roundtable Description: In December, 2015 the paperback version of Philip Hamburger’s Is Administrative Law Lawful? was published. This roughly 600 page book is the most systematic legal assault on the foundations of the modern American administrative state published in the past fifty years. Comparing modern administrative practices to those of the Star Chamber and High Commission during English Stuart tyranny, Hamburger argues that both rulemaking and administrative adjudication fail to conform to the traditional standards of rule through law. No serious student of American administrative law can dismiss the important claims made by this book without thorough study and examination. To facilitate this process we propose a roundtable.
Paper Title:
Panel Title:
Panel Description:
Roundtable Description: In December, 2015 the paperback version of Philip Hamburger’s Is Administrative Law Lawful? was published. This roughly 600 page book is the most systematic legal assault on the foundations of the modern American administrative state published in the past fifty years. Comparing modern administrative practices to those of the Star Chamber and High Commission during English Stuart tyranny, Hamburger argues that both rulemaking and administrative adjudication fail to conform to the traditional standards of rule through law. No serious student of American administrative law can dismiss the important claims made by this book without thorough study and examination. To facilitate this process we propose a roundtable.
Co-author info:
Co-presenter info:
Abstract:


Name: Courtney Broscious
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: brosciousc@easternct.edu
Professional Status: Assistant Professor
Institution: Eastern Connecticut State University
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
Participation Type:
Roundtable Title:
Roundtable Description:
Paper Title: From data reporting to program management: A new approach to utilizing data in local drug court programs
Panel Title:
Panel Description:
Roundtable Description:
Co-author info: Fred Cheesman, National Center for State Courts, fcheesman@ncsc.org
Co-presenter info:
Abstract:
Performance Measurement has long been a requirement for publicly-funded programs. Congress requires regular performance reports from the bureaucratic agencies and their grantees. Data required for these reports can provide programs with information that can additionally be useful in program management and accomplish more than just establishing accountability to funding agencies. Programs, however, often show reluctance to use this same data to self-evaluate. This paper examines a practical approach to using this data for performance management and begins to explore how program staff self-evaluate in publicly-funded drug court programs. The findings of this research inform the both the public administration literature on performance measurement and management and the public policy literature aimed at increasing productiveness of publicly funded programs.


Name: Anthony Del Signore
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: delsignore.an@gmail.com
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: Temple University
Scheduling Preference: Thursday Morning
Proposal Type: Paper
Participation Type:
Roundtable Title:
Roundtable Description:
Paper Title: Morality and United States Foreign Policy: Framing Debates about Human Rights
Panel Title:
Panel Description:
Roundtable Description:
Co-author info:
Co-presenter info:
Abstract:
Morality policy framing typically revolves around several policy issues of private moral behavior (sexuality, abortion, etc.) Foreign policy has yet to be analyzed through the framework of morality policy. This study seeks to expand the application of morality policy framing to include human rights abuses. To do this, I study congressional debates on US foreign policy over a twenty year period (1995-2015). First, I hypothesize that congressional representatives use morality policy frames when discussing human rights abuses and rational instrumental frames when discussing other issues of foreign policy such as trade. Second, I hypothesize that issues of self-interest are more likely to be framed morally in post-September 11th society as terrorism has become an increasingly salient issue. Finally, I hypothesize that frames concerning human rights abuses against Christians will be used more by representatives in states with higher Evangelical populations due to reelection concerns.


Name: Brian Ford
Section:
Professional Email: bpford1@gmail.com
Professional Status: Practitioner
Institution: NYC Dept of Education
Scheduling Preference: Friday Afternoon
Proposal Type:
Participation Type:
Roundtable Title:
Roundtable Description:
Paper Title: Social Learning and Hegemony: Comparing Paradigm Change in Economics and Education
Panel Title:
Panel Description:
Roundtable Description:
Co-author info:
Co-presenter info:
Abstract:


Name: Seulhan Lee
Section: Congress, Presidency, & the Courts
Professional Email: seulhanlee@gmail.com
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: University of Missouri-Columbia
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
Participation Type:
Roundtable Title:
Roundtable Description:
Paper Title: Staffing and Professionalization within the Congressional Committee's decision-making process
Panel Title:
Panel Description:
Roundtable Description:
Co-author info:
Co-presenter info:
Abstract:
This analysis is about how the congressional committee in Congress influences the decision-making process. I study professionalization and congressional committees’ staffing process to find out the effects on the decision-making process in the U.S. Congress staffs’ professional level has increased in U.S. over time at both the state and federal level. However, it is still not clear how congressional staffs and their professionalization influence the decision-making process in Congress in the congressional committee system. In this paper, I apply the concepts of professionalization to congressional staffs, and their hiring process to learn how they are hired, and how their professional impacts on their hiring process. Then, with staffs’ legislative professionalization, I show how congressional legislatures have become more professional over time. Eventually, in this study, I will first discuss congressional staff’s professionalization and hiring process regarding their committee, while focusing on the staffs’ policy oriented background. Secondly, I apply the concept of professionalization to explain how the committee influences the decision-making process in Congress.


Name: Christopher Mcmillan
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: Christopher.McMillan@bridgew.edu
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: Bridgewater State University
Scheduling Preference: Thursday Morning
Proposal Type: Paper
Participation Type:
Roundtable Title:
Roundtable Description:
Paper Title: The Politics of Coal in the Current Federal Election Environment
Panel Title:
Panel Description:
Roundtable Description:
Co-author info:
Co-presenter info:
Abstract:
Abstract: Since the height of Appalachian coal production in the 1950s, employment in the industry and in mining operations has faced a steady decline. The contributing factors related to this decline include advances in mining‐technology, an increase in the foreign production of coal, and federal environmental policies. The current presidential debate has seen a renewed interest in the future of coal mining in general and in the Appalachian region in particular, which signals a significant departure from its previous lack of national political salience. This paper addresses the question: why has such an obscure issue, the unemployment of coal miners in the Appalachian region, found new political life in the rhetoric and discourse of those seeking elective office? This paper begins with the historical foundation of the demise of coal in the region, discusses current governmental policies that both aggravate the issue and attempt to alleviate its consequences, and discusses the politics of coal on the federal level, addressing both congressional and presidential campaigns. Using evidence from campaigns for congress and the presidency, secondary historical sources, and interviews among stakeholders, this paper addresses the politics of coal within John Kingdon’s “three streams” framework. In conclusion, I suggest that the failure of political actors to address the conditions effecting domestic coal production and consumption will have critical political and policymaking repercussions.


Name: SooJin Song
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: joa.soojinsong@gmail.com
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: University of Delaware
Scheduling Preference: Friday Afternoon
Proposal Type: Paper
Participation Type:
Roundtable Title:
Roundtable Description:
Paper Title: The Absence of Government Regulations and Corporate Irresponsibility: A Lesson From the Humidifier Scandal in South Korea
Panel Title:
Panel Description:
Roundtable Description:
Co-author info: HYEJUNG KIM, Korea University, suri0519@korea.ac.kr
Co-presenter info: HYEJUNG KIM, Korea University, suri0519@korea.ac.kr
Abstract:
In 2011, seven pregnant women caught acute lung disease due to some unknown reason, of which four of them didn't survive. This was the beginning of the humidifier scandal in South Korea. The cause of those women’s death were chemicals,


Name: Linda St.Cyr
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: lindalstcyr@gmail.com
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: East Stroudsburg University
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
Participation Type:
Roundtable Title:
Roundtable Description:
Paper Title: PA Core: Do Common Core Standards Prepare Seniors for Higher Education in the Pennsylvania State System of Education?
Panel Title:
Panel Description:
Roundtable Description:
Co-author info:
Co-presenter info:
Abstract:
The purpose of this research is to assess whether Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts and mathematics prepares high school students for their freshman year in college. The research seeks to answer whether CCSS in Pennsylvania high schools aligns with college entry expectations and student learning outcomes in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). A content analysis and a comparative analysis of PA Core Standards with their alignments to student learning outcomes (SLOs) in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) was developed as part of the research design. This research conducted is intended to be part of a larger time analysis research project after students who have graduated from a PA- Core high school enter the higher education system. This paper focuses on a content analysis of the history of education policies including the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, its reauthorization as No Child Left Behind and the development of Common Core State Standards, and why Pennsylvania adopted a modified version of CCSS called PA-Core. The research looks at the student learning outcomes of the 14 colleges in PASSHE and looks at the student learning outcomes for the fourteen main high schools associated with each college in PASSHE. For example, East Stroudsburg University’s student learning outcomes were compared to the PA-Core standards at East Stroudsburg High School. Common Core State Standards (CCSS) will force changes on the student learning outcomes in higher education including preparation for credit-bearing courses, remediation, and college retention rates. Research on this topic is important because colleges within state systems could be forced to agree on what it means to be “college ready”. Higher education institutions may be forced into changing placement and remediation criteria. There are no current studies on the effects that the common core curriculum will have specifically on higher education in Pennsylvania. Research is currently being conducted by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) and the National Center for PostSecondary Research (NCPR) on the impact of CCSS on higher education in a broader sense. NCPR’s research focuses on the implications of CCSS’s impact on community colleges and whether students are prepared for a community college education by assessing CCSS curriculum alignment through interviews with individuals who were involved with CCSS at the national level and by interviews with higher education representatives that played a large role in shaping CCSS policies that have been adopted by 45 states as of July 2012. The research conducted by PARCC and NCPR creates the theory that is the framework for this paper. The information gained from this research could enhance education policies and initiatives in Pennsylvania and help better prepare high school students for college.


Name: Joshua Steinfeld
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: joshua.steinfeld@ucf.edu
Professional Status: Assistant Professor
Institution: University of Central Florida School of Public Administration
Scheduling Preference: Thursday Afternoon
Proposal Type: Paper
Participation Type:
Roundtable Title:
Roundtable Description:
Paper Title: TOWARD PROFESSIONALIZATION: A JOB STUDY OF KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES IN PUBLIC PROCUREMENT AND ADMINISTRATION
Panel Title:
Panel Description:
Roundtable Description:
Co-author info:
Co-presenter info:
Abstract:
Public administration (PA) scholars have been struggling to define their occupation as a profession (see Gargan, 1989; Stivers, 1994; Denhardt, 2016). Similar to PA, the field of public procurement is striving to achieve its status as a profession (Thai, 2001; Prier and McCue, 2009; Steinfeld et al., 2016). This manuscript examines professionalism in PA through studying the job tasks managed by public procurement practitioners. The purpose of this manuscript is to establish a baseline to benchmark what these practitioners actually do on their jobs. Factor analysis is used to study a data set of 2593 respondents that were administered a job analysis by the Universal Public Procurement Certification Council (UPPCC) in 2012. The main problem statement to be addressed involves the investigation of knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA’s) in public procurement by studying practitioner responses to 75 questions related to the job tasks they manage. The job tasks that are found to be related through the factor analysis are considered to be those of public procurement since the sample consists of solely public procurement practitioners and because job tasks that are managed in tandem or in conjunction with each other are indicative of a robust measure of a set of job tasks actually managed in public procurement. A review of literature discusses the alternative perspectives on what constitutes professional approaches in the public sector such as political, neutral, sociological, constitutional, and other lenses. The reasons for focusing on public procurement professionalism are subsequently presented through the literature. Despite the various views of what entails professionalism in public administration, i.e. responsible (Stivers, 1994), sociological (Simon, 1947), constitutional (Rohr, 1986; Lowi, 1995), Parsons’ (1939) view that professions involve technical specialty and empirical rigor resounds as a theoretical basis for examining practitioner job tasks as an inquiry into professionalism for this study. Hummel’s (1991) view that knowledge in management is as valid as knowledge in science provides a foundation for operationalizing KSA’s into job tasks and measuring management thereof. Factor analysis is conducted on 75 job tasks in order to identify relationships between practitioner job tasks to find out what it is that public procurement practitioners actually do for their work, and what KSA’s are necessary for management of the job.